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  1. So asynchronous programming is something quite difficult to do in JavaScript, but since we now have Promises and async/await, it's becoming increasingly less complicated. Plus there is no need for "callback hell". So I will assume you understand what Promise.all() is and why it can sometimes be problematic, as it will not wait for all requests to complete and just fails on the first rejected Promise. The following function will still reject on a failed Promise, but the difference being it will wait for all the Promises to complete before resolving or rejecting. If no failure occurred, then the resolved value is the same as Promise.all(), an array of resolved values; otherwise, it returns a completed object (see below for details). Also note that the array might contain empty slots, this is so it's easier to debug which Promise failed in the array, as they're inserted in the same index slot Promise.allComplete = (iterable) => { if (!Array.isArray(iterable)) { throw new TypeError('Invalid argument, expected "iterable" to be an array'); } const completed = { resolved: [], rejected: [], }; const wrapResolutionOrRejection = (type, index) => valueOrReason => (completed[type][index] = valueOrReason); const wrappedIterable = iterable.map((value, index) => Promise.resolve(value) // The rejected wrapper function could be put in the catch, but it's wasteful for our purposes .then(wrapResolutionOrRejection('resolved', index), wrapResolutionOrRejection('rejected', index)) ) return Promise.all(wrappedIterable) .then(() => completed.rejected.length === 0 ? Promise.resolve(completed.resolved) : Promise.reject(completed)); }; // Example const requests = [ createPromise(true, 10), createPromise(false, 10), createPromise(true, 200), createPromise(true, 1000), ]; // Rejects on the first Promise which fails, but if you check in the console, it didn't wait // for the third Promise to successfully complete, as the console log came after the error log was displayed // Promise.all(requests) // .then(values => console.log('Successfully completed', values)) // .catch(err => console.error('Not successfully completed', err)) // "allComplete" is different, in that it will wait for all the Promises to be completed i.e. resolve and reject, // then resolve if all Promises were successful or reject if one Promise failed. // It returns the following data structure: // { // resolved: [...Promises which resolved, and inserted by the associated Promise's index], // rejected: [..Promises which rejected, and inserted by the associated Promise's index], // } Promise.allComplete(requests) .then(completed => console.log('Successfully completed', completed)) .catch(completed => console.log('Not successfully completed', completed)) function createPromise(isResolved, delay) { return new Promise((resolve, reject) => { setTimeout(() => { console.log(`Promise: "${delay}"`); if (isResolved) { resolve(delay); } else { reject(new Error('An unexpected error occurred')); } }, delay); }); }
  2. Hello guys Today I'll give you three functions to manage the list View items These functions will help you to do some works in your list view items 1. list view Read To get the selected item text 2. listView_checke To checke an item 3. isListViewChecked To see if the item is checked All of these functions will be illustrated by the following example You can download the include file from the link below Now with the example #include <easy_listView_functions.au3> #include <GUIConstantsEx.au3> #include <GuiListView.au3> #include <MsgBoxConstants.au3> Example() Func Example()  Local $idListview  GUICreate("ListView Get Item Checked State", 1000, 700)  $idListview = GUICtrlCreateListView("", 50, 30, 250, 120, 50)  _GUICtrlListView_SetExtendedListViewStyle($idListview, BitOR($LVS_EX_FULLROWSELECT, $LVS_EX_CHECKBOXES)) ; Add items $item1 = GUICtrlCreateListViewItem("item1", $idListview) $item2 = GUICtrlCreateListViewItem("item2", $idListview) _listview_Checke($idListview, "item1") $btn = GUICtrlCreateButton("&read", 100, 150, 50, 50) $btn2 = GUICtrlCreateButton("&if checked", 100, 200, 100, 50)  GUISetState(@SW_SHOW) while 1 switch GUIGetMSG() case $GUI_EVENT_CLOSE  GUIDelete() exit case $btn $read = _ListView_read($idListView) if $read then msgBox(0, "read listview", $read) else msgBox(0, "read listview", "no text ditected") endIf case $btn2 if _isListviewChecked($idListView, "item1") then msgBox(0, "get", "the item is checked") else msgBox(0, "get", "the item isn't checked") endIf endSwitch wend EndFunc   ;==>Example easy_listView_functions.au3
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