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ThickOfIt

vista uac does not prompt when using runwait()

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ThickOfIt

I wrote a scipt to detect required software and download & install if not found. It runs ok on 2000 and xp. I ran on Vista home premium and my custom error checking shows that the programs download but don't install. When I start the installs manually, I get a UAC prompt.

Does anyone know of any alternative ways to start these installs?

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rudi

I wrote a scipt to detect required software and download & install if not found. It runs ok on 2000 and xp. I ran on Vista home premium and my custom error checking shows that the programs download but don't install. When I start the installs manually, I get a UAC prompt.

UAC is so     l o v e l y    :)

For sure you know this one, do you? UAC uncool Video

Does anyone know of any alternative ways to start these installs?

Isn't UAC the very first thing to disable on Vista? :)

Honestly: No clue, as for the very few Vista Workstations I have to service, disabeling UAC WAS the very first thing I did. In stead of arranging with UAC: Kick it!

Regards, Rudi.


Earth is flat, pigs can fly, and Nuclear Power is SAFE!

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trancexx

Isn't UAC the very first thing to disable on Vista? :)

No. That should be completely out of the question.

@ThickOfIt, add #RequireAdmin keyword to your scripts. See how that works.


♡♡♡

.

eMyvnE

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ThickOfIt

This script is going to be run on machines that are not under my control. These people could have policies in place that forbid disabling UAC.

I was running as a admin when I tested my script the first time, but I'll try the #RequireAdmin.

The answer could be to start the installer with a runas or batch file.

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TurionAltec

No. That should be completely out of the question.

I agree, out of the question. First people complain that Windows XP by default runs as admin (which was only done because poorly coded legacy apps have a fit if they can't write all over the place), so Microsoft institutes UAC, which allows for privilege escalation similar to sudo, and then people complain when the stuff they're doing require escalation. They can't win! I run XP as a limited access user, and I leave UAC turned on in Vista/7. If a program isn't coded to respect that I get very upset!

And that stupid Apple commercial. Apple has the same gosh darn popups for privilege escalation! Add to that other annoying dialogs. By default the user is warned if they're downloading an application! And that commercial that makes fun of Vista "bloat". Ever see how many gigs of printer drivers and languages OSX installs by default? Say nothing for the resource robbing poor performance of Apple software on Windows.

What I recommend, when you are setting up a machine and going to be installing a lot of software, and other things that would trip UAC, use TweakUAC to set it to quiet mode, then once the machine is set up, set UAC back to full mode.

http://www.tweak-uac.com/home/

------------

Back to the script,

#RequireAdmin will prompt for elevation at execution when run under limited privileges in 2000/xp/vista/seven, and everything in the script should be run with those privileges, preventing the need for more dialogs part way through.

This means script will ask for escalation every time it is started, regardless of whether it needs it or not. If this poses a problem, eg: if your program is an application which simply checks for prereqs when it's started, split the script into two scripts

Script 1: Main script.

-If prereqs don't exist,

Runwait("script2")

Endif

Continue execution

----

Script 2: Installer

#requireadmin

Inetget("Installer.exe")

Runwait("installer.exe")

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