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Silent Install

13 posts in this topic

How do I make a silent install of AutoIt ?

/Sven

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#2 ·  Posted (edited)

Please elaborate on silent install !

For instant if you remove all cooling fans from your motherboard you computer will not make as much noise.

(You do however run the risk of overheating you motherboard)

Even better, if you incase your computer in a sound proof dome you wont hear a thing.

(This method is not advised as it reduces accessibility and is also very expensive)

On a serious note: I can only imagine you want to automate the install of autoit and have no visible windows pop up prompting the user for input and to press next, etc?

Things you should have learnt from this post:

* Explaining your problem in detail is the only way you will get a serious responce.

* Cooling fans are noisy.

* Motherboards over heat.

* Sound proofing is expensive

Edited by Nova

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#3 ·  Posted (edited)

No, I think it was pretty clear what Sven was asking. (In fairness it's probably because I've had enough experience with silent installs to know the term... but it's not really an ambiguous one anyway.)

I believe you can initiate a silent installation by calling the setup program in this way:

autoit-v3-setup.exe /S /D=C:\Program Files\AutoIt3

You may possibly need quotes around the install folder (haven't tested the above command line).

Edited by LxP

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No, I think it was pretty clear what Sven was asking. (In fairness it's probably because I've had enough experience with silent installs to know the term...)

I would like to apologize to Sven, I have never heard the term silent install.

I'm under a bit of pressure at work today, I shouldnt have snapped like that, i'm sry.

Nova

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I would like to apologize to Sven, I have never heard the term silent install.

I'm under a bit of pressure at work today, I shouldnt have snapped like that, i'm sry.

Nova

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Even if you are sorry, I understand where you came from and you gave me quite a laugh :).

I also understand where he is coming from and I do believe LxP is on the right track.

JS


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File-String Hash Plugin Updated! 04-02-2008 Plugins have been discontinued. I just found out.

ComputerGetInfo UDF's Updated! 11-23-2006

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Vortex Revolutions Engineer / Inventor (Web, Desktop, and Mobile Applications, Hardware Gizmos, Consulting, and more)

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I would like to apologize to Sven, I have never heard the term silent install.

I'm under a bit of pressure at work today, I shouldnt have snapped like that, i'm sry.

Nova

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

i knew what he meant, but still thought your post was pretty funny...

1100111 00001011101111 00011101101111 00010111100100 00001111110100 00110111110010 00101101111001 0011100i didn't make up this form of encryption, but i like it.credit to the lvl 6 challenge on arcanum.co.nz

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#7 ·  Posted (edited)

Nova, if you want a near silent PC, take a big fishtank, and drop your computer in with the back to the bottom, (or mount it that way,) and fill up the fishtank with mineral oil just past the motherboard, but not to any drives. Hard drives, CD roms, DVDs, and floppies don't work well submerged. Mineral oil is a good electrical insulator, the exhisting fans in the system will circulate the oil and you will have a fast easy and quiet liquid cooled system.

:)

edit, I just remembered one of my favorite quotes (taken out of context):

I have a funnel on top of my PC and just add water to shut it off.

Lar.

:evil: Edited by scriptkitty

AutoIt3, the MACGYVER Pocket Knife for computers.

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Nova, if you want a near silent PC, take a big fishtank, and drop your computer in with the back to the bottom, (or mount it that way,) and fill up the fishtank with mineral oil just past the motherboard, but not to any drives.  Hard drives, CD roms, DVDs, and floppies don't work well submerged.  Mineral oil is a good electrical insulator, the exhisting fans in the system will circulate the oil and you will have a fast easy and quiet liquid cooled system.

:)

edit, I just remembered one of my favorite quotes (taken out of context):

:evil:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Have you actually tried this?

Why don't the HDs work - I thought that they are sealed anyway? Or is it just a problem of a pressure differential?

And your fans don't burn up? I would think they would have problems, since they were not designed to push through the resistence of a ivscious liquid.

Interesting idea tough... Do you have any pics?

We're working on cooling issues here - we've got 16U equipment that we're trying to redesign to fit into 2U, and heat is becoming a huge problem - we had an AC go out once, and the server room hit 150F overnight.

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#9 ·  Posted (edited)

here is the first guy to do it. (that I've heard)

dynamic picture:

Posted Image

Markus Leonhardt has taken the shortest route possible to liquid cooling.

  1. throw motherboard in fish tank

  2. cover in vegetable oil

  3. there is no step 3

Markus has been using this system for over a year. it is quiet and is cooled by the still functional fans circulating the oil. he has swapped components and even successfully used pulled hardware in other pcs. the pages are in the process of being translated to english, but the english forum is already up with links to other projects. Ive got some extra hardware and fish tanks are cheap, so Ill give this a try some time. I doubt my roommate will feel this is an improvement over my plan of just nailing the motherboards to the wall.

It has been done a lot more after, one of the funny ones was a guy who sealed up his HD, and ended up glueing the plates together, and then later he had a crack in the fish tank and it.... well you get the picture. :)

If you really wanted to design a system, you could drop in a few heat sink towers as well. As long as they touched the oil at some point they would work, and if you had AC going, well it would stay room temp.

I was to outfit a nice pelican box, with external USB2 HD for my room. The plastic doesnt' conduct heat well enough, so I am thinking up other options. As far as the fans go, you can remove some fins, and make sure that the speed alarm is off.

I used to work with high voltage transformers, and they would put mineral oil in the sealed cases for this same purpose. Those transformer cases (all metal) would get pretty hot, they were enclosed in metal boxes that had air holes and would get up to temperatures of 130-150 degrees. The natural flow of air was sufficient for cooling.

I have an old 486 or something ancient lying around here, If I can find a bucket or something large enough I will do it and take some pictures. :evil:

EDIT: Don't use vegitable oil on a real system unless you live alone and want to keep it that way, it could go rancid and well....

Edited by scriptkitty

AutoIt3, the MACGYVER Pocket Knife for computers.

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here is the first guy to do it. (that I've heard)

dynamic picture:

Posted Image

It has been done a lot more after, one of the funny ones was a guy who sealed up his HD, and ended up glueing the plates together, and then later he had a crack in the fish tank and it.... well you get the picture. :)

If you really wanted to design a system, you could drop in a few heat sink towers as well. As long as they touched the oil at some point they would work, and if you had AC going, well it would stay room temp.

I was to outfit a nice pelican box, with external USB2 HD for my room.  The plastic doesnt' conduct heat well enough, so I am thinking up other options.  As far as the fans go, you can remove some fins, and make sure that the speed alarm is off.

I used to work with high voltage transformers, and they would put mineral oil in the sealed cases for this same purpose.  Those transformer cases (all metal) would get pretty hot, they were enclosed in metal boxes that had air holes and would get up to temperatures of 130-150 degrees. The natural flow of air was sufficient for cooling.

I have an old 486 or something ancient lying around here, If I can find a bucket or something large enough I will do it and take some pictures. :evil:

EDIT:  Don't use vegitable oil on a real system unless you live alone and want to keep it that way, it could go rancid and well....

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

NICE. let me know if you do this and get it to work. i saw a motherboard at comdex 2 years ago suspended in a non-conductive fluid for the same purpose, but would want to hear a first hand account of how difficult it is before i attempt it myself.

1100111 00001011101111 00011101101111 00010111100100 00001111110100 00110111110010 00101101111001 0011100i didn't make up this form of encryption, but i like it.credit to the lvl 6 challenge on arcanum.co.nz

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If you really wanted to design a system, you could drop in a few heat sink towers as well. As long as they touched the oil at some point they would work, and if you had AC going, well it would stay room temp.

I would have to experiment with this - it come down to which is a better conductor - the fluid or the metal (or other material) that the sink is made of

I was to outfit a nice pelican box, with external USB2 HD for my room.  The plastic doesnt' conduct heat well enough, so I am thinking up other options.  As far as the fans go, you can remove some fins, and make sure that the speed alarm is off.

I guess that might work. I'll also look into fans that are designed to be submerged (like the ones that move water in a fountain or jacuzzi tub or something)

I used to work with high voltage transformers, and they would put mineral oil in the sealed cases for this same purpose.  Those transformer cases (all metal) would get pretty hot, they were enclosed in metal boxes that had air holes and would get up to temperatures of 130-150 degrees. The natural flow of air was sufficient for cooling.

Yes, I've heard of these. I think that the big transformers on power poles are the of this type?

EDIT:  Don't use vegitable oil on a real system unless you live alone and want to keep it that way, it could go rancid and well....

I'm thinking that if I seal and pressurize the whole thing, then it shouldn't be a problem?

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Thanks for the help, Silent install is the same as unattended install, now I know how to do it.

/Sven

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If you really wanted to design a system, you could drop in a few heat sink towers as well. As long as they touched the oil at some point they would work, and if you had AC going, well it would stay room temp.

I would have to experiment with this - it come down to which is a better conductor - the fluid or the metal (or other material) that the sink is made of

My actual thought is of an external heatsink for the oil. Much like a radiator is to a car. Instead of pumping the fluid though an external radiator, I was saying you could just place a small part of it in the liquid (direct contact *conduction.) I was counting on Convection to move the heat from the CPU, Transformers, and other hardware heat sources with a slight help from internal fans. If the external heatsink was used, then the normal convection forces in the room may provide an adiquate heat transfer system.

I don't have a drawing of the type of heatsink tower I was thinking of, but imagine a CD rom disk with a nickel on top of it, and then a CD, then a nickel, then a CD, then a nickel, etc etc... about 2-3' tall and was actually made completely of metal.

If it was going to be a sealed system, you could mount a submersible pump inside with the tube going out, run it through a couple bucks of coiled copper tubing, and back into the box. Of course this is pretty much like a common radiator ( normal radiators are more efficient through the use of thin metal fins to provide a larger air area.) Again thinking of standard convection to cool this instead of forced air.

Now that you got me talking about it, I am going to have to put one of these together. :whistle:

*

Conduction is heat transfer by means of molecular agitation within a material without any motion of the material as a whole. If one end of a metal rod is at a higher temperature, then energy will be transferred down the rod toward the colder end because the higher speed particles will collide with the slower ones with a net transfer of energy to the slower ones.

Convection is heat transfer by mass motion of a fluid such as air or water when the heated fluid is caused to move away from the source of heat, carrying energy with it. Convection above a hot surface occurs because hot air expands, becomes less dense, and rises (see Ideal Gas Law). Hot water is likewise less dense than cold water and rises, causing convection currents which transport energy.


AutoIt3, the MACGYVER Pocket Knife for computers.

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