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neoviakleipk

light

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In art you are tought that all colors of made of three different primary colors.

Red, Yellow, Blue.

By combining these colors you get Orange, Green, and Purple. By futher combining those with each other and their parental primes, you can create even more colors. When combining these together, they make a darker color.

However, on a computer system, color is composed of red, green, and blue light. When these are combined together, they make a brighter color. All of these together make white.

What I need is an algorithim, that I can use in AutoIt which will allow me to convert Red, Yellow, and Blue combinations into Red, Green, and Blue combinations.

I also need to understand why it is different in art than in computer systems. I need this for a school project.

Is anyone able to help me understand how light behaves so I can understand why it is different like this?

It is simply mind boggling why you can't use Red, Green, and Blue as primary colors on paper but you can do it in programming or scripting.

Remember, I need an AutoIt function to do this, and I need you to explain to me exactly how it works, and why it works based on how light works.


[font="Franklin Gothic Medium"]I am the 9th solution according to some.[/font]

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#2 ·  Posted (edited)

Remember, I need an AutoIt function to do this, and I need you to explain to me exactly how it works, and why it works based on how light works.

My, what an advanced project for a school. Are you are M.I.T.? When you put a blob of red paint on a white piece of paper, the blob does two things: it reflects red light back from itself, and it absorbs all the other colors. That means that the net energy returned is less than sent. Now, if you shine a 100 Watt red light at a white piece of paper, the paper does a good job of returning a high percentage of the light back. If you then shine an additional 100 Watt blue light at the paper you will get twice as much energy back. As you keep adding lights, the paper gets brighter and brighter, and the colors combine to approximate what the sun puts out and that we "perceive" as white. That is, white light is a perfect mix of all wavelengths of light.

Conversely, the more paint colors you add, the more they have to share the amount of light sent to them (100 watts), the more they absorb, and the more muddied looking they get. It is difficult to produce pure black by mixing paints. You can approximate black with inks (3-color inkjet printers, for example). But that's because the inks are semi-transparent and actually light is reflected through them, off the white paper, and back to your eye. Mixing red, yellow, and cyan inks will eventually block all light from being reflected by the paper, and you "see" black.

How this all ties into AutoIT requires too much thought and work. I wish you good luck! Too bad we've recently lost our best programmers... ;)

Edited by jefhal

...by the way, it's pronounced: "JIF"... Bob Berry --- inventor of the GIF format

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#3 ·  Posted (edited)

My, what an advanced project for a school. Are you are M.I.T.? When you put a blob of red paint on a white piece of paper, the blob does two things: it reflects red light back from itself, and it absorbs all the other colors. That means that the net energy returned is less than sent. Now, if you shine a 100 Watt red light at a white piece of paper, the paper does a good job of returning a high percentage of the light back. If you then shine an additional 100 Watt blue light at the paper you will get twice as much energy back. As you keep adding lights, the paper gets brighter and brighter, and the colors combine to approximate what the sun puts out and that we "perceive" as white. That is, white light is a perfect mix of all wavelengths of light.

Conversely, the more paint colors you add, the more they have to share the amount of light sent to them (100 watts), the more they absorb, and the more muddied looking they get. It is difficult to produce pure black by mixing paints. You can approximate black with inks (3-color inkjet printers, for example). But that's because the inks are semi-transparent and actually light is reflected through them, off the white paper, and back to your eye. Mixing red, yellow, and cyan inks will eventually block all light from being reflected by the paper, and you "see" black.

How this all ties into AutoIT requires too much thought and work. I wish you good luck! Too bad we've recently lost our best programmers... ;)

M.I.T? Nah. It's just a project for a scripting course. We have to do the research ourselves. They don't teach us this stuff.

I told the teacher it was too hard for us, but he just said BS. We are trying to get him fired, so we can have another scripting teacher because the one we have now is a whole. Too bad they can't find anyone else that can teach AutoIt.

About those "best programmers", your not refering to Ligenza and friends are you?

Edited by neoviakleipk

[font="Franklin Gothic Medium"]I am the 9th solution according to some.[/font]

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I told the teacher it was too hard for us, but he just said BS. We are trying to get him fired, .

You know, the man who says "I can" and the man who says "I can't" are both right. Which are you?

Good grief, another whining kid afraid to learn something and trolling for his homework to be done for him. In addition, he wants to spend his effort firing someone who has the audacity to try to get him to utilize his brain ( you know, the thing three feet above your ...)

Too bad they can't find anyone else that can teach AutoIt

You've got full docs, and the forum to use for syntax / logic questions and issues - what more do you need?

There are a ton of color pickers out there, and a bunch of ways to handle conversion between various color layouts, and a bunch of discussions as tho the theory behind the algorithms.


Reading the help file before you post... Not only will it make you look smarter, it will make you smarter.

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#5 ·  Posted (edited)

You know, the man who says "I can" and the man who says "I can't" are both right. Which are you?

Good grief, another whining kid afraid to learn something and trolling for his homework to be done for him. In addition, he wants to spend his effort firing someone who has the audacity to try to get him to utilize his brain ( you know, the thing three feet above your ...)

Too bad they can't find anyone else that can teach AutoIt

You've got full docs, and the forum to use for syntax / logic questions and issues - what more do you need?

There are a ton of color pickers out there, and a bunch of ways to handle conversion between various color layouts, and a bunch of discussions as tho the theory behind the algorithms.

;) You hurt my feelings!!!

You know, the man who says "I can" and the man who says "I can't" are both right. Which are you?

Uhm.... ok. Thats weird. I just said something exactly like that in another thread, and I come back here to find this.

*sigh* Very well then. I'll look it up, and make my own algorithim. I am sure I'll figure it out eventually.

Edited by neoviakleipk

[font="Franklin Gothic Medium"]I am the 9th solution according to some.[/font]

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#6 ·  Posted (edited)

I am sure I'll figure it out eventually.

We know you can... MIT or not. Remember the MIT fight song:

M.I.T.

P.H.D.

M.O.N.E.Y

sung to the tune of Mickey Mouse.

2. The son of a wealty MIT inventor asked his father to buy him a "Mickey Mouse Outfit", so his father bought him IBM... ;)

Edited by jefhal

...by the way, it's pronounced: "JIF"... Bob Berry --- inventor of the GIF format

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We know you can... MIT or not. Remember the MIT fight song:

M.I.T.

P.H.D.

M.O.N.E.Y

sung to the tune of Mickey Mouse.

2. The son of a wealty MIT inventor asked his father to buy him a "Mickey Mouse Outfit", so his father bought him IBM... ;)

Yea, i know, that was me. My gf said she would only go out with me if I dressed up like Mickey Mouse.

*not true*


[font="Franklin Gothic Medium"]I am the 9th solution according to some.[/font]

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Good grief, another whining kid afraid to learn something and trolling for his homework to be done for him. In addition, he wants to spend his effort firing someone who has the audacity to try to get him to utilize his brain ( you know, the thing three feet above your ...)

Too bad they can't find anyone else that can teach AutoIt

You've got full docs, and the forum to use for syntax / logic questions and issues - what more do you need?

There are a ton of color pickers out there, and a bunch of ways to handle conversion between various color layouts, and a bunch of discussions as tho the theory behind the algorithms.

Hmmm, this is a suppport forum, not a judge person from the one post they make forum. Why u would you even say something like that is beyond me, you dont know this 'whining kid' at all. Keep your opinions to yourself.

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Also, keep in mind that the cones in the eye (the color receptors) have their own "primary" "colors":

Tristimulus Model:

There are three kinds of cone light sensors in the human eye. They are alike in physical structure, but differ in the particular light-sensitive chemical they use. Thus the three different kinds of cones respond to different parts of the visible light spectrum. Greek letter Roman letter color band peak sensitivity

Beta S blue 440 nm

Gamma M green 544 nm

Rho L red 580 nm

That means that the paint primaries (red, yellow, blue), and the printing primaries (magenta, cyan, yellow) are all just artificial models...

...by the way, it's pronounced: "JIF"... Bob Berry --- inventor of the GIF format

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See, you got your homework done for you after all! ;)

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