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slightly_abnormal

dll calls, how do you know functions?

8 posts in this topic

i was wondering how you guys who use dll calls figure out what to call, and where everything should be placed, can you give some pointers i was checking out a dll with dllexplorer it had a function but in a script theirs different calls

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#2 ·  Posted (edited)

i was wondering how you guys who use dll calls figure out what to call, and where everything should be placed, can you give some pointers i was checking out a dll with dllexplorer it had a function but in a script theirs different calls

Find the call you want to use in the .dll, and look it up on the net and find the necessary parameters to use it. :P

Nomad :D

Edit: Having some experience calling .dll's in C++ is also useful, since AutoIt was written in C++ you need very similar syntax as you would need to do it in C++. :D

Edited by Nomad

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#3 ·  Posted (edited)

well i finally figured one thing out... i forgeting to call "str", or "int" before loading my settings..

btw i couldn't find the dll in google :D

thns for the tip

Edited by slightly_abnormal

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Usually people use dll's that are distributed with windows xp/98..

They check the parameters on the msdn website. And Usually when you get a dll it should come with documentation on how to use it.

but check out the msdn...

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well i finally figured one thing out... i forgeting to call "str", or "int" before loading my settings..

btw i couldn't find the dll in google :D

thns for the tip

The use of "str", "int", "ptr", etc.. is related to the syntax of using .dll functions in C++, which is one reason I referred to the syntax of such. :P There are also other necessary steps in some cases where you will have to declare a variable as a DWORD or a BYTE, etc..

Searching for the .dll itself will not narrow down the results as much as searching for the name of the function call within the .dll. For example, in the user32.dll for the _IsPressed UDF, it calls the "GetASyncKeyState" function. If you search for user32.dll, you are going to get a lot more search results to sort through than you will get by simply searching for GetASyncKeyState.

Every function call within the .dll is also going to have different parameter requirements to use it, just like using a AutoIt function, each one requires different input to perform as instructed. Which is why you should first find the function call you want to use, then search for that. If you wanted to use MouseMove() in AutoIt, would you search for AutoIt, or MouseMove? ;)

The Dll functions in AutoIt really help to make it extremely flexible since it allows you to do things you couldn't normally do with AutoIt. I recommend familiarizing yourself with them. If you don't use beta, I would also get that. There are some key Dll functions in the beta that aren't included in the non-beta.

Nomad :D


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Throwing it into eXeScope, and checking the export section, is a fair start.

-mu

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Throwing it into eXeScope, and checking the export section, is a fair start.

-mu

Hi,

I tried your tip with exescope with the 'scrrun.dll' (home of the fso object...)

I looked in the Export section but I didn't see any common function of the known fso object

Do you know a reason why?

Greetings

Mozart90

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For a known dll, follow the advice given above, i.e. read the documentation. If it's a dll that can be registered, there's probably a loads of available functions.

ExeScope (or similar tool) is just useful for trying to get *anywhere* with an unknown dll file. I figured anyone seeking out a topic like this would benefit from having it in their kit-bag.

-mu

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