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Flash1212

Volatile Registry Keys

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Flash1212

Hi, was just curious if a volatile registry key could be created with built in AutoIT functions or is VBS the only way?

Ex: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WindowsUpdate\Auto Update\RebootRequired

This is the volatile key used by Windows Update Agent. When the system reboots it will be deleted since it's held in memory.

Can AutoIT make something like this or do I have to start converting VBS?


**The only limit is what you believe they tell you it is**

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GEOSoft

Any registry functions that can be done using VBS can be done using AutoIt. On a side note, if it was "held in memory" it wouldn't need the registry entry.


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Flash1212

I'm aware that VBS can be written in AutoIT. I was curious as to whether or not there was a simple function like "Regwrite" (though I didn't see it in the help file) instead of writing it in VBS. Maybe some one has created a UDF for this kind of thing. Sounds like there isn't though, but no big deal.

Also, the registry key is not necessary unless you want something else to know it is there say a another program wondering if the system needs a reboot. According to Microsoft it is held in memory "http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms724844(VS.85).aspx"

REG_OPTION_VOLATILE

0x00000001L

"All keys created by the function are volatile. The information is stored in memory and is not preserved when the corresponding registry hive is unloaded. For HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, this occurs when the system is shut down."


**The only limit is what you believe they tell you it is**

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Inverted

Look at the poor helpfile, in the functions, in the Registry Management ...

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Flash1212

Ok, I must not be explaining what I'm looking for correctly. That's ok, because I'm pretty sure that there is no prebuilt function for this.

I have looked at "at the poor helpfile, in the functions, in the Registry Management ... ". It doesn't discuss a function that does what I'm looking for as far as I can tell.

Thank you all for the input anyways.


**The only limit is what you believe they tell you it is**

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Inverted

Why don't you RegWrite the key you need ?

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Richard Robertson

Why don't you use DllCall?

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Flash1212

Inverted -

A regular Regwrite will remain once I reboot the machine. I could have something else to attempt to delete it after the fact but that's not what I'm trying to accomplish. The idea is to have it stored somewhere where other apps can see/read it, but disappear if for any reason the system powers down or reboots.

Richard -

What DllCall did you have in mind? Can you give an example?


**The only limit is what you believe they tell you it is**

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Inverted

First time I hear about this volatile weirdness !

Anyway, Richard's suggestion is to use DllCall to directly call the RegCreateKeyEx windows API and pass the REG_OPTION_VOLATILE parameter.

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Flash1212

Hmm... I'll look into that. Thanks the suggestion and explanation.


**The only limit is what you believe they tell you it is**

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