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trancexx

Sphere

7 posts in this topic

#1 ·  Posted (edited)

Sphere is probably one of the most important geometric entities in 3D modeling.

OpenGL gives more than one way of rendering sphere. One is explained here since the sphere can be seen as the special case of the torus.

Another way is to use available glu function. The name of the function is gluSphere.

Description can be found here, and implementation in AutoIt in this example:

H2O.zip

Example is showing two molecules of water (red is oxygen, blue hydrogen). Since I'm not that good with chemistry it could be a little off. I hope you wouldn't mind.

Snowman script is another example. Link to that script.

Edited by trancexx

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eMyvnE

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Thanks KaFu, you too.

I wrote flayouts didn't I? ;)


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eMyvnE

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#4 ·  Posted (edited)

Snowman is like three balls, few buttons, carrot and stuff...

I can draw that. See:

If you would have any problems with the above script (wrong colors or something), try this one:

Snowman3D2.zip

Edited by trancexx

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eMyvnE

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My colors was messed up. Why?

I would like to learn linear algebra someday. Do you know it?


Broken link? PM me and I'll send you the file!

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My colors was messed up. Why?

I would like to learn linear algebra someday. Do you know it?

I was trying to "compile" as much elements as I could with that script to reduce the CPU maximally. Since I'm in process of learning handling OpenGL hence often not knowing the outcomes of my actions, that lead to a total confusion of materials.

Coincidentally, that code was and is working just fine on XP. Nevertheless, it seems wrong now.

Algebra is boring and some parts of it tend to hurt my head. I love mathematical analysis and that part of mathematic though.


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eMyvnE

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This is a sweet example! I do a lot of experiments with electrolysis of water and always wanted to make something showing the H20 molecule being split into hydrogen and oxygen. This will help so much if I every try to take a crack at it again. I'm also shocked to see how low the cpu is without any assembly. Thanks for sharing. Your scipts are the best to learn from.;)

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