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Andreik

Degauss Monitor

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I want to use Degauss Monitor function but I don't know how I can get a handle to a physical monitor.

More info from MSDN


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I'm guessing you read that you need to have a CRT (non-lcd/flatscreen) monitor and vista to use this. Also there was a thread yesterday about getting monitor handles but you could use MonitorFromWindow and just pass a handle to your current autoit window (you can get that with WinGetHandle() :)) and there you go. MonitorFromWindow returns a handle to the monitor the window is currently displayed on (if I read correctly)

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I'm guessing you read that you need to have a CRT (non-lcd/flatscreen) monitor and vista to use this. Also there was a thread yesterday about getting monitor handles but you could use MonitorFromWindow and just pass a handle to your current autoit window (you can get that with WinGetHandle() >_<) and there you go. MonitorFromWindow returns a handle to the monitor the window is currently displayed on (if I read correctly)

I have Win XP :) I don't know why should I have Vista to degauss my monitor because almost all monitors have this functions.


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All CRT montiors yes but newer monitors (lcd) don't have degauss since they display in a different manner and don't need a degauss function. Degauss just demagnetizes the monitor so it doesn't work up enough magnetism to bend the light and cause an improper display. The reason you need vista is that it's included in one of the newer vista .dll files (I think) and if you have a CRT why can't you just press the degauss button or tell the user to do so?

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All CRT montiors yes but newer monitors (lcd) don't have degauss since they display in a different manner and don't need a degauss function. Degauss just demagnetizes the monitor so it doesn't work up enough magnetism to bend the light and cause an improper display. The reason you need vista is that it's included in one of the newer vista .dll files (I think) and if you have a CRT why can't you just press the degauss button or tell the user to do so?

I want to do without any intervention from outside but in this case I will do it manually. :)

Thanks for informations. >_<


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That function on the MSDN says it only works on Vista. If you use XP, you are out of luck and have to do it manually.

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That function on the MSDN says it only works on Vista. If you use XP, you are out of luck and have to do it manually.

Not to be a jerk but I'm pretty sure we covered that already :).

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All CRT montiors yes but newer monitors (lcd) don't have degauss since they display in a different manner and don't need a degauss function. Degauss just demagnetizes the monitor so it doesn't work up enough magnetism to bend the light and cause an improper display.

Close. The stray metal parts of a CRT monitor's chassis getting magnetized causes stray bending of the electron beam inside the CRT. This causes the beam to hit the inside of screen at the wrong places, distorting the display.

To get huge deflection you need an intense field. You should see what happens to a CRT on a Navy ship when they light off their hull degaussing system. Pretty freaky.

As you correctly pointed out, LCDs don't use electron beams and are immune to this effect.

I don't think electromagnetic fields can bend light paths. That's part of what makes fiber optic cable so sweet for data transmission in industrial environments.

:)

(Yes, this was only posted because it's a lazy Saturday morning...)


Valuater's AutoIt 1-2-3, Class... Is now in Session!For those who want somebody to write the script for them: RentACoder"Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced." -- Geek's corollary to Clarke's law

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#10 ·  Posted (edited)

Close. The stray metal parts of a CRT monitor's chassis getting magnetized causes stray bending of the electron beam inside the CRT. This causes the beam to hit the inside of screen at the wrong places, distorting the display.

To get huge deflection you need an intense field. You should see what happens to a CRT on a Navy ship when they light off their hull degaussing system. Pretty freaky.

As you correctly pointed out, LCDs don't use electron beams and are immune to this effect.

I don't think electromagnetic fields can bend light paths. That's part of what makes fiber optic cable so sweet for data transmission in industrial environments.

:)

(Yes, this was only posted because it's a lazy Saturday morning...)

I agree. Electromagnetic field can not bend significant the direction of light.

Edited by Andreik

When the words fail... music speaks

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I agree. Electromagnetic field can bend significant the direction of light at a macro-level.

Not applicable in this case.

...can NOT...

:)


Valuater's AutoIt 1-2-3, Class... Is now in Session!For those who want somebody to write the script for them: RentACoder"Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced." -- Geek's corollary to Clarke's law

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...can NOT...

:idiot:

:) That is English taught in school. I want to say can not. >_<


When the words fail... music speaks

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#13 ·  Posted (edited)

I was speaking to Andreik because he didn't appear to understand why it wouldn't work without Vista.

Edited by Richard Robertson

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Of course your monitor will have to support the degauss function via a software command.

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