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Belini

Find loudest sound of the video.

18 posts in this topic

I need to know the loudest sound is in a video file, I made tests with ffmpeg.exe more each time it returns a different value, one can say the name of another program able to return this information?

$File = @ScriptDir & "\test.mp4"
$vol = Run(@ComSpec & ' -i ffmpeg.exe -af volumedetect -f null -"' & $File & '"' , @ScriptDir, @SW_HIDE)
MsgBox(4096, "Test 1", $vol)

$File = @ScriptDir & "\test.mp4"
$vol = Run(@ComSpec & ' -i ffmpeg.exe  -af volumedetect -f null"' & $File & '"' , @ScriptDir, @SW_HIDE)
MsgBox(4096, "Test 2", $vol)

$File = @ScriptDir & "\test.mp4"
$vol = Run(@ComSpec & ' -i ffmpeg.exe  -af volumedetect -f"' & $File & '"' , @ScriptDir, @SW_HIDE)
MsgBox(4096, "Test 3", $vol)

$File = @ScriptDir & "\test.mp4"
$vol = Run(@ComSpec & ' -i ffmpeg.exe -af volumedetect "' & $File & '"' , @ScriptDir, @SW_HIDE)
MsgBox(4096, "Test 4", $vol)

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#2 ·  Posted (edited)

Run returns the PID of the process you start.  Which means that $vol in your code will most likely be a modestly large integer that goes up at each use.  You need to instruct the client to send back the standard out stream and capture that in a loop.  Then you need to read that.

I don't have ffmpeg, so I can't tell if this is correct, but it should get you started...

#include <Constants.au3>

$File = @ScriptDir & "\test.mp4"
$pid = Run(@ComSpec & ' -i ffmpeg.exe  -af volumedetect -f null"' & $File & '"' , @ScriptDir, @SW_HIDE, $STDOUT_CHILD)
$data = ""
While True
    $data &= StdoutRead($pid)
    If @error Then ExitLoop
Wend

ConsoleWrite($data & @LF)
Edited by mrider

How's my riding? Dial 1-800-Wait-There

Trying to use a computer with McAfee installed is like trying to read a book at a rock concert.

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#3 ·  Posted (edited)

It did not work with these commands as well.

 

> Running AU3Check (3.3.9.4) a partir de: C: Arquivos de Programas AutoIt3

+> 15:53:42 AU3Check ended.rc: 0
> Running: (3.3.9.4): C: Arquivos de Programas AutoIt3 autoit3.exe "E: Teste script.au3"    
-> Pressione Ctrl + Alt + F5 para reiniciar ou Ctrl + BREAK para interromper
Microsoft Windows XP [versÆo 5.1.2600]
© Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.
 
E: Teste>
+> 15:53:42 AutoIT3.exe ended.rc: 0
> Código de saída: 0 Tempo: 2.392

 

The DDVideoMP4Gain.exe program can show the highest sound of video files plus it does not accept command line to return the information I need, will have any dll able to return this information?

Edited by Belini

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#5 ·  Posted (edited)

Let me say this differently: I do not have or use ffmpeg.exe .  I have no idea how one would go about getting the loudest sound.  I have no idea if it's even possible - from any software anywhere - since this is not something I've ever attempted or even thought about.

HOWEVER, your first post output the PID of the process created, and couldn't possibly have shown the sound.  I was simply pointing that out.

I apologize if I misled you. :)

 

[EDIT] I should add that I was under the impression that if one were to run ffmpeg.exe  -af volumedetect -f null "test.mp4" that one would see the loudest sound output on the console.  And so consequently, I thought that all one had to do was correct the method used to get the output, and one would get the answer.

Edited by mrider

How's my riding? Dial 1-800-Wait-There

Trying to use a computer with McAfee installed is like trying to read a book at a rock concert.

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 I have no idea how one would go about getting the loudest sound.  I have no idea if it's even possible - from any software anywhere - 

 

Yes you can! DDVideoMP4Gain.exe can show the loudest sound of the video, Mp3Gain.exe shows the highest sound .mp3 and Mp3Gain.exe also normalizes all files in the same volume.

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Belini,

Before write something in Autoit you need to know what you do with the external software, like read the documentation.

-i = input_file, instead i see -i ffmpeg.exe :sweating: 

Anyway this is the working code, learn from it:

#include <Constants.au3>

$sFile = @ScriptDir & "\Test.mp4"
$iPID = Run(@ComSpec & " /c ffmpeg.exe -i " & '"' & $sFile & '"' & " -af volumedetect -f null NUL", @ScriptDir, @SW_HIDE, $STDERR_CHILD)
Local $sData = ""
Do
    $sData &= StderrRead($iPID)
Until @error
ConsoleWrite("--> DEBUG: " & @CR & $sData)
$aData = StringRegExp($sData, '(?:' & "max_volume: " & ')(.*?)(?:' & " dB" & ')', 3)
If IsArray($aData) Then MsgBox(0, "max_volume", $aData[0])

Nothing is so strong as gentleness. Nothing is so gentle as real strength

 

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Terrenz Thanks for replying, did tests with 3 files that have different levels of volume and still could not find the loudest sound of them, see the result:

 

File 83.8db = result: -0.9
File 88.1db = result: -1.8
File 102.9db = result: -0.0

 

Follow the link to download the files I testedhttps://www.dropbox.com/s/6ndfyr7x6ktp45e/Test_max_vol.rar?dl=0

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#10 ·  Posted (edited)

looks fine to me

 

I do not understand why a negative value is the highest sound and why sound files above 100dbs return -0!

Edited by Belini

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#12 ·  Posted (edited)

I used to see DDVideoMP4Gain.exe the loudest sound files and I can not get these same values, dbs of each file is in their name.

Archives test: https://www.dropbox.com/s/6ndfyr7x6ktp45e/Test_max_vol.rar?dl=0

Note: any program from the command line or dll to return this information will serve to me and not have to be just using ffmpeg.exe

Edited by Belini

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Belini,

What you what to do is called "peak normalization", meaning that it will make the loudest part in the file sit at 0 dB instead of something lower. In one of your example, the maximum volume is -0.9 dB, so you need apply 0.9 dB gain. If you get a value of 0 dB, then you don't need to normalize the audio. The command is:

-af volume=XdB

Where X is the value of dB. Is clear now? ;)


Nothing is so strong as gentleness. Nothing is so gentle as real strength

 

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In this way it will not work because the files that give zero is precisely the highest 102dB and I want to standardize all to 89dB

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#15 ·  Posted (edited)

Ok, my last try. Download AACGain 1.9. From the commandline:

aacgain.exe path/of/the/102.9db.mp4

The output is:

Recommended "Track" dB change: -14.190000
Recommended "Track" mp3 gain change: -9
Max PCM sample at current gain: 47727.753906
Max mp3 global gain field: 186
Min mp3 global gain field: 100


Recommended "Album" dB change for all files: -14.190000
Recommended "Album" mp3 gain change for all files: -9

102.9 - 14.1 = 88.8 dB

For normalize the audio:

aacgain.exe /r path/of/the/102.9db.mp4

Or you can use your value, check the help of the commandline

Edited by Terenz

Nothing is so strong as gentleness. Nothing is so gentle as real strength

 

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102.9 - 14.1 = 88.8 dB

 

If I had this information would be easy but in the example you posted when the louder the sound file is larger than 100dbs always returns -0.0.
 
Normalizar.jpg
 
I have more than 10.000 videos and most are already normalized 89dbs, I need the information to separate only the files that are to the sound below or above 89dbs
 

 

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#17 ·  Posted (edited)

No Belini you don't have understand  ;)

That calculation ( 102.9 - 14.1 ) was only to prove that AACGain work fine and give you the correct result because instead of the wrong 0.0 dB of ffmpeg, AACGain return -14.1 dB ( Recommended "Track" dB change: -14.190000 ) so you need to subtract that 14.1 value for have the 89 dB or make the AACGain automatically did for you with the /r parameter, you don't need to know how many decibel is the file, but you can easy know if you are intrested*

For example to the 83.8 file give:

Recommended "Track" dB change: 5.690000

Another correct result because adding 5.6 dB, i'll repeat you don't need to know the starting dB, normilize the audio to 89 dB.

* If the 89 is the default value, just add or subtract the "Recommended "Track" dB change" for know the dB of the file.

#include <Constants.au3>

$sFile = @ScriptDir & "\Test.mp4"
$iPID = Run(@ComSpec & " /c aacgain.exe " & '"' & $sFile & '"', @ScriptDir, @SW_HIDE, $STDOUT_CHILD)
Local $sData = ""
Do
    $sData &= StdoutRead($iPID)
Until @error
ConsoleWrite("--> DEBUG: " & @CR & $sData)
$aData = StringRegExp($sData, '(?:' & 'Recommended "Track" dB change: ' & ')(.*?)(?:' & "0000" & ')', 3)

; How to get the dB of the file
If IsArray($aData) Then
    If StringInStr($aData[0], "-") Then
        MsgBox(0, "Volumn(dB)", 89 + StringReplace($aData[0], "-", ""))
    Else
        MsgBox(0, "Volumn(dB)", 89 - $aData[0])
    EndIf
EndIf
Edited by Terenz
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Nothing is so strong as gentleness. Nothing is so gentle as real strength

 

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You were right from the start and did not understand what you said, now I can do what I need, thanks for your help and patience.

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