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CompileIt - an experimental AutoIt-to-machine code compiler 0.0.1

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About This File

This is an experimental AutoIt-to-machine code compiler, written in AutoIt, JavaScript and C.

Make sure you have GCC installed and configured within CompileIt before using.


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Skysnake

   1 of 1 member found this review helpful 1 / 1 member

I have access to the Code::Blocks GCC compiler.

In order to get this to work, I did the following:

  • Create a local folder with all the includes required, the supplied .au3 sample files for the project, as well as the supplied includes;
  • Create a new project (.cbp) and added all these files (select *);
  • Hit Build!

The output file should be created as expected.  :) 

 

The challenge here is not compiling AutoIt to machine code, but in developing the compiler friendly parts of AutoIt at a pace that matches user needs.  By proving that AutoIt can be compiled like this, even if it first has to be transliterated into a lower level language, such as C in this case, the door is open for full function compiled AutoIt executables - in machine code.

This also places AutoIt in a position where it can produce compiled scripts, much the same way Lua does.

At this time the achievement is getting the idea to work in practice.  Even baby steps will change the way AutoIt can be used in the future.

Watch this space. :)

Skysnake

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