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SSD Size & Longevity/Resilience/Speed


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My program is reading, writing & processing gbs of data everyday.

1. Will this eventually damage & reduce SSD write/read speed over time?

2. Would running programs off of multiple dedicated smaller SSDs help increase/retain performance?

If anyone knows that would be much appreciated!

I've been planning on investing in some SSDs!

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Posted (edited)

That is a very broad question, as there is no one blanket rule for all SSDs - you have different quality drives that are purpose-built for different activities. If you Google "SSD longevity vs HDD" you will find a number of articles from different companies that have performed testing, on a wide array of hardware from normal 'home-user' grade to multi-thousand $$ enterprise drives using NAND and ECC.

Edit: Fixed spelling, up way too early this morning

Edited by JLogan3o13

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The down side of SSD's is they have a limited number of writes but the limit is pretty big:

Samsung states that their Samsung SSD 850 PRO SATA, with a capacity of 128 GB, 256 GB, 512 or 1 TB,  is “built to handle 150 terabytes written (TBW), which equates to a 40 GB daily read/write workload over a ten-year period.”  Samsung even promises that the product is “withstanding up to 600 terabytes written (TBW).” A normal office user writes approximately between 10 and 35 GB on a normal day. Even if one raises this amount up to 40 GB, it means that they could write (and only write) more than almost 5 years until they reach the 70 TBW limit.

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2 hours ago, argumentum said:

See if you can use a RAM disk for faster read/write.

Excellent suggestion, I use the RAM for all I/O heavy operations, it is the most durable AND the most fastest medium to process data :D

The only downside is that it is volatile, so no long-term storage. But it works great as long as your machine is powered :)

There are quite a few programs to do this in Windows, but I personally use ImDisk (which also supports mounting of disk images), I also think it offers an option for persistent RAM storage by automatically backing everything up in an image before shutting down.

2 hours ago, argumentum said:

Also, I rather use NVMe over SSD.

Strictly speaking, NVMe is a connection interface, the underlying storage system is always and SSD. I assume you are referring to SATA SSDs by "SSD" :)

--

I personally use the SSD for my OS partition as well as my home partition as it makes things fast, but for everything else, I use my other "SSD", i.e slow spinning disk :muttley:

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6 hours ago, wolflake said:

The down side of SSD's is they have a limited number of writes but the limit is pretty big:

Samsung states that their Samsung SSD 850 PRO SATA, with a capacity of 128 GB, 256 GB, 512 or 1 TB,  is “built to handle 150 terabytes written (TBW), which equates to a 40 GB daily read/write workload over a ten-year period.”  Samsung even promises that the product is “withstanding up to 600 terabytes written (TBW).” A normal office user writes approximately between 10 and 35 GB on a normal day. Even if one raises this amount up to 40 GB, it means that they could write (and only write) more than almost 5 years until they reach the 70 TBW limit.

You should post the link to where you get your information 

My resources are limited. You must ask the right questions

 

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5 hours ago, argumentum said:

See if you can use a RAM disk for faster read/write. Also, I rather use NVMe over SSD.
If for long time storage, use something to attend to bit-rot.

NVME is still an SSD just a different type and faster than SATA 3 ssd

 

nvme can be sata as well but the preferred type is the PCIE type of drive For the greatest speed And performance

Edited by Earthshine

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4 hours ago, TheDcoder said:

The only downside is that it is volatile

The second downside is that RAM is small; even with 64 GB, many of my datasets wouldn't fit in there.:'(

4 hours ago, TheDcoder said:

ImDisk

I second the motion;:thumbsup:ImDisk is the best, free, open-source RAM disk manager I've ever used.

Edited by RTFC
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You can consider a RAID (-5 or -6) system of SSDs. Use a good dedicated RAID controler, like ARECA or similar. You'll minimize SSD wear yet benefit from RAID robustness and speed.

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Yeah, I've long used 8 HP SAS drives (15k rpm) but these server-class HDDs are much more expensive than today's SSDs having a similar capacity. I still have my Areca ARC1882I RAID controller but I don't have any use of it now.

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Another excellent RegExp tutorial. Don't forget downloading your copy of up-to-date pcretest.exe and pcregrep.exe here
RegExp tutorial: enough to get started
PCRE v8.33 regexp documentation latest available release and currently implemented in AutoIt beta.

SQLitespeed is another feature-rich premier SQLite manager (includes import/export). Well worth a try.
SQLite Expert (freeware Personal Edition or payware Pro version) is a very useful SQLite database manager.
An excellent eBook covering almost every aspect of SQLite3: a must-read for anyone doing serious work.
SQL tutorial (covers "generic" SQL, but most of it applies to SQLite as well)
A work-in-progress SQLite3 tutorial. Don't miss other LxyzTHW pages!
SQLite official website with full documentation (may be newer than the SQLite library that comes standard with AutoIt)

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SSDs are great, but they have 1 major inconvenience (it is well documented).  If there is an unexpected electricity shutdown, there is a small chance of corrupting the drive.  

It happened to me once, and I had to repair and reinstall OS.  But mine is quite old ~7 years.  I believe recent SSD drives are less vulnerable nowadays. 

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